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College Speeds Up For Defense, WWII: Home

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College Speeds Up For Defense

Dr. Masters Announces Changes To The Student Body This Week: Social Affairs Drastically Cut To Four Dances
The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, has affected the world in various ways. This week it cut into the very heart of Albright College life by precipitating a dramatic change in the the college calendar.

President Harry V. Masters officially announced these changes to the student body in the college chapel this week. Along with these changes Dr. Masters stressed the need for people to become aware of the seriousness of the situation and also the need for increased effort on the part of each individual.

The official changes as set forth by the administration are as follows:

  1. First semester examinations--January 19 to 24, inclusive, except on Wednesday morning, January 21, at which time there will be Registration for the second semester.
  2. Second semester begins Monday, January 26--8 a. m.
  3. Spring vacation will begin Thursday, April 2, after the last class and end Monday, April 6 at 8 a. m.
  4. Examinations for the second semester will be held May 11 to 15, inclusive, except on Wednesday morning, May 13, which will be used for advance Registration.
  5. The Baccalaureate Service will be held Friday evening, May 15. Commencement will be held Saturday morning, May 16.

Other adjustments relative to other activities of the college will be in accordance with the announcement in Chapel on Monday and Tuesday, January 12 and 13, and future official notices.

Dinners Canceled

Other changes made in the schedule include social activities. The number of affairs was cut down to four, including a combined sorority dance, a combined fraternity dance, a day student dance, and a Junior-Senior ball. These affairs are to be semi-formal and all dinners have been canceled.

College drama has also been curtailed by the omission of the next Domino production and the Greek play.

Source: The Albrightian, January 16, 1942